Archives for posts with tag: Do this

Following a year and a half of red-hot sales of succulents and cacti, many garden centers are starting to notice an increase in consumer inquiries about bonsai trees and bonsai pots. These traditional shallow planters can also be used for many other sorts of plantings, including fairy gardens, succulents, and some forced bulbs. The following ideabook from houzz.com offers a concise overview of some bonsai basics:

Classic Urn - Snap ShotIn the January, 2015 issue of Green Profit magazine, Jennifer Polanz pointed out that in the current marketplace, “porch pots” have the potential to help boost your off-season sales throughout the winter months if you take the time to properly merchandise the category. A few of the top ideas:

  • Conduct design workshops in which you offer customer a wide range of suitable planters, greenery, and accessories.
  • Have your staff design and build amazing porch pot arrangements – use social media to share them with your customers and drive traffic to your store.
  • Rotate the greenery and accessory offerings as Winter progresses – Jingle bells may be a great addition in December, but they won’t drive sales in February!

Here’s a link to the complete article.

Terra Cotta Flower Pots at RetailThe August issue of “Today’s Garden Center” magazine includes an article titled “8 Ways to Increase Pottery Sales“, which has some terrific pointers from Sloat Garden Center CEO & President Dave Stoner. I’ll address many of his ideas in a later (and longer) post, but I wanted to quickly relay the information included in a sidebar called “5 Suggestions From Sloat’s Dave Stoner” – these idea are all absolute gold, and should be seriously considered by any garden center active in the pottery category:

  1. Jump in with both feet. “It’s not a huge investment to bring in a container or two of pottery, and you cant make a statement without quantity”
  2. Always be deep in it, and don’t play the weather game. “You will sell pots year-round, especially in temperate climates. Make sure you have a plan for storage and restocking, especially if you have multiple locations. It doesn’t need water, and it doesn’t die.
  3. Think of pottery as a negative space filler. “It can make your nursery look  full in the off-season when you have less plant material”
  4. Don’t try to carry everything all at once. ” Try to get a sense of what your customer wants, or work with your supplier to get a sense of the best colors. Build the line as you go, changing or shuffling along the way.
  5. Always stock saucers and pot feet “I can’t stress this enough!”

Luna Sphere Indoor Flower PotAn article by Kylee Baumle in the June issue of “Garden Center” magazine raises several great points about the benefits that houseplants can offer to your customers. She makes the point that in addition to beautifying the interior of a home, houseplants are also good for our physical and emotional well-being, as they filter the air, produce oxygen, increase humidity, and improve productivity. The article is definitely worth a read.

She also suggests that garden centers can do more to bring these benefits to their customers’ attention, such as building a display vignette featuring an indoor setting (her recommendation is using beneficial plants and a desk or table), or adding signage near plants that explain some of the healthy perks offered by interior plants.

Health benefits aside, “drop-in gardening” is a growing category that shouldn’t be ignored. A broad spectrum of consumers are drawn to indoor gardening for a range of reasons – it tends to be an easy if not “idiot-proof” way for them to brighten their homes and to bring a bit of Summer indoors during the colder seasons. Indoor container gardening is generally affordable and convenient, further broadening its appeal. Add in the fact that these customers are also often in the market for affordable pots and saucers , and you’ve got a recipe for winning sales.

We were very pleased to see the following article in this month’s edition of “Green Profit”, highlighting some great tips on best practices in retail merchandising of flower pots. We were especially happy to see a few of our customers highlighted in the Article, as well as some thoughts from our Director of Marketing and Product.

Container gardening is huge, but merchandising containers is often an afterthought. Do you have a leaning tower of pots in your display area? What about ceramics that haven’t been dusted for a year? How about a mishmash of broken terra cotta, concrete urns and oddly shaped containers thrown together at the back of your garden center? If that describes the state of the (dis)union of your pottery category, you have nowhere to go but up. Here are two unique perspectives on merchandising containers so they’re moneymakers instead of space takers.

Keep It Simple

Our first perspective is from Alec Junge of pottery distributor Ceramo Co., who declares simple is best. “I think that two of the most frequent failure points for a pottery display are succumbing to the temptation to over-merchandise and neglecting to maintain the displays,” he says.

Crisscross
Stack pottery near the plants. The single most effective way to boost pottery sales is to incorporate the pots into other display areas of the store, and the easiest location from which to grab these additional sales is near the flowers. In the photo above, a simple display has been built from stacked pallets and positioned as an end cap of an aisle of flowers.

Clean & Accessible
Keep it simple with red clay/terra cotta pots. Farrand Farms in Kansas City, Missouri, merchandises these garden staples so they’re neatly sorted, easily accessible and clean. They’ve used a very simple homemade fixturing system, grouped the pots by type and size, and most importantly, have done the ongoing work necessary to keep the display tidy and organized.

Two-For-One
Cross-merchandise to sell more. One of the most effective (and cost-effective) ways to market flower pots is to include them in other display areas of a garden center. Here at Knupper Nursery and Landscape in Palatine, Illinois, a range of Ceramo’s German “Basalt” pots are part of the holiday fixturing. Using the pots this way is a two-for-one proposition: customers get more exposure to the pots while they’re in another area of the store, and the “fixtures” (pots) can be sold at full price after the holiday display is taken down.

Investing In Pottery
Our second perspective is that of merchandiser and owner of Color Results Terri Coldreck, who emphasizes making an investment (not just money, but time) in pottery. Read on for her top 3 tips for successful pottery sales.

Click here for the entire article:

http://ballpublishing.com/greenprofit/ViewArticle.aspx?articleid=19797